OUT 18020

Classification: Ordinary Chondrite H6

Explainer: This means that the sample is from an asteroid parent body. It represents early Solar System material which includes chondrules (small round melt droplets). It is from a very common type of chondrule-bearing meteorite called the ordinary chondrite class. This particular type is an ‘H’ type – meaning it has high concentrations of iron (i.e. iron metal). The meteorite is also a type 6 sample – which means that it has been highly metamorphosed (heated and/or held under high pressure). You can see more about where this sample fits into the meteorite classification scheme by looking at this page.



Description: Taken from the Meteoritical Bulletin for OUT 18020

History: The meteorite was recovered as part of the Lost Meteorites of Antarctica project, which was funded in the UK by the Leverhulme Trust and supported by the British Antarctic Survey and the University of Manchester. These samples were collected as part of the project’s first field season in austral summer December 2018 – January 2019 by a two person field party consisting of Katherine Joy and Julie Baum. Found on blue ice surface at Outer Recovery Icefields ice field 3 (west icefield). Altitude 1552 m.

Physical characteristics: Mass: 4.52 g. Pieces: 1. Dimensions: 3 cm x 1.5 cm x 1 cm. An irregular, part stone with 50% black fusion crust and light grey interior.

Petrography: Poorly defined (up to 1 mm) chondrules, equilibrated texture. Metal and sulfide grains up to 1 mm.

Mineral compositions and geochemistry: All analyses by EPMA. Olivine Fa 20.0±1.2 (N=10), Pyroxene Fs 17.3±0.8 (N=13), Wo 1.3±0.3 (N=13).

Specimens: 3.85 g type specimen (main mass) held at the NHM London.



Project comments: Regrettably the field context photo for this sample didn’t work for reasons unknown, which was of great frustration to Katie. The meteorite was found on a very sloped area of ice where we didn’t think would be a good place for meteorites to sit…



Sample images and videos:

OUT 18020 sample in the lab after defrosting. Image: Lost Meteorites of Antarctica / The University of Manchester
OUT 18020 sample in the lab after defrosting. Image: Lost Meteorites of Antarctica / The University of Manchester
OUT 18020 sample in the lab after defrosting. Image: Lost Meteorites of Antarctica / The University of Manchester